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New Archeology Discoveries in Greece

Remnants of an Ancient City Unearthed in Tenea, Greece

Conn Archaelogy Site in Recent Archaeology Finds:

In the period from 1 September to 10 October 2018, the Directorate of Antiquities and Cultural heritage conducted a systematic archaeological survey in Chiliomodi, Korinthia, within the framework of the research programme within the vicinity of Tenea.

The work focused on two main areas: the area of an organized cemetery of Hellenistic and Roman periods with accompanying buildings and in a second area, where for the first time residential remnants of ancient Tenea were identified and excavated. The latter is evidence for the identification of an ancient city, whose existence was speculated through historical sources and lapidary testimonials of past and modern scholars. At the same time, there was wide-scale surface and geophysical research.

According to a legend, the ancient Tenea was founded by prisoners of the Trojan War. Agamemnon – King of Mycenae and brother of Menelaus was the one that allowed them to build the city.

Among the finds is a ring with a seal that represents the deity Serapis on a throne and a mirror with a representation of the goddess Hygieia – deity of healing, cleaning, and health-, multiple currencies, among which three date back to the early days of Corinth as a Roman colony, around 44-40 BC.

In this area, more than two hundred coins were found, dating from the beginning of Hellenism until the end of the Roman period, many of which belonged to Lucius Septimius, the first Roman Emperor of North African origin. Here at the Society of American Archaeologists, we have an archive listing some findings. This shows that Tenea probably did well economically during the reign of the dynasty. The Ministry of culture informed that these discoveries prove that Tenea suffered the consequences of the invasion of the Peloponnese of the Visigoth King Alaric I in the 396-397 BC and that it could have been abandoned at the end of the 6th century.

 

Nimes – Latest Archaeological News

The Conn Archaeology Website Presents: discovery of millenary tombs of children. A team of archaeologists has uncovered forty graves of children under five at the foot of the Roman city wall, reports France Bleu.

It is an astonishing discovery made by archaeologists in Nîmes. A team from the Inrap (National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research) has uncovered forty or so millennial graves of children on Montaury Hill, at the foot of the Roman city wall, reports Thursday France Bleu . These tombs of children under five date from the 1st and 2nd centuries AD , says the radio.

Few details have been provided on the reason for the presence of these tombs at the foot of the Roman rampart. But archaeologists are convinced that these excavations and this discovery will help to better understand how young children were considered and treated by society at that time. “We can not say whether they are children of slaves, freedmen or free men, or even the elite,” said France Bleu Richard Pellet, archaeologist of Inrap in charge of these excavations Nîmes. “In fact, it tells us especially the status of the child in Roman society. ”

Be sure to check out the extensive library at the Conn Archaeology Site.

Other excavations needed

These graves were not put there by chance, suggests the researcher. They have several architectural features that make them particularly visible, including three towers with different shapes: octagonal, round and barlongue. They are also raised nearly six meters and were dug at the foot of a very well preserved piece of the Roman wall of Nîmes , 300 meters long. The city of Gard is currently reflecting on how the site could be preserved and exposed to the public. According to France Bleu, a dozen or even twenty tombs are still to be searched. A new work campaign should be done soon in the summer of 2019.